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Observation + Inquiry + Exploration = STEAM
Science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics (STEAM) makes connections across these disciplines, as well as with the humanities. With emphasis on scientific observation, technological exploration, artfully engineered design, and computational thinking, STEAM is the catalyst for creative problem solving and global understanding.
Working with the iPad or MacBook Air in a 1:1 environment and using the resources of six science laboratories, four design spaces, and the Math Center, students from all divisions design solutions to real world problems. Science courses are hands-on and laboratory-based, and projects are connected to the broader curriculum. Throughout the School, science and math classes share a common language that supports learning across the curriculum. Upper School electives include creative computing, engineering, entrepreneurship, and statistics, as well as options to study advanced chemistry, biology, physics, and calculus. Every Marymount senior elects to take math and/or science for four years of high school. Marymount STEAM students are also textbook authors, workshop presenters, and conference planners.



Independent Research

The independent science research program is designed to provide students with an opportunity to pursue scientific research at the college level. In this three-year program, student researchers begin by investigating a topic of personal interest. Using professional scientific databases, students hone their research skills, preparing them to design and conduct mentored scientific research. Recent topics have included: teenage compliance with COVID-19 guidelines from the CDC; ESKAPE pathogens and their resistance to all known antibiotics; and decellularizing plant tissues for tissue scaffolds.

E4USA: Engineering for All

Marymount partners with E4USA, a national engineering program for high schools funded by the National Science Foundation. In this year-long curriculum, students from select schools across the country build an awareness of how engineering is used in daily life, practice a systematized method of engineering design that builds autonomy and mastery, and solve local and global engineering design challenges. In partnership with New York Institute of Technology, seniors in the Engineering elective build an awareness about engineering in everyday life, explore the value of diversity in the engineering field, and feel empowered to be part of the industry in the future.

Coding

While the gender gap in technology continues to grow, Marymount students have many opportunities to learn coding and programming. Students in Lower School explore programming logic and reasoning by coding small robots such as the Ozobot and Osmo, while Lower Mid students use littleBits to support learning in cross-curricular STEAM classes and math/science classes. Students build on this experience in the Upper Mid by working on several interdisciplinary projects in science, technology, and art. Upper School students can take several coding electives, including Digital Design and Fabrication, Interactive Web Programming, and AP Computer Science A.

Beyond the Classroom

Marymount students broaden their professional learning networks beyond the classroom. All physics students are members of SWENext, a K-12 initiative of the Society of Women Engineers, and all students in the Class XII Atmospheric Science elective are members of the local chapter of the American Meteorological Society and also coordinate the Youth Climate Conference. Marymount is also a member of the GAINS Network, a school-based virtual community for high school girls interested in STEM topics that connects them with female leaders in STEM-related fields. The Student Technology Leadership Team coordinates the annual STEMxYouth Summit, a world-renowned conference for high school students and educators that provides access to STEM researchers and professionals worldwide.